Monthly Archives: March 2013

What is Lumbar Radiculopathy?

Posted: Thursday, March 28th, 2013 | Filed under: Back health, Lumbar pain, Spinal Surgery, Spine conditions, Spine Surgery | author: By admin
Radiculopathy

Lumbar Radiculopathy Education

If the vertebrae (the bones of the spine), or the cushioning discs between them impinge on the root of a nerve in the spinal column, chronic injuries to the nerve may result. Radiculopathy is the general term for these injuries. The condition most commonly occurs in the lower, or lumbar region of the spine, termed lumbar radiculopathy. Radiculopathy may also occur in the neck, or cervical region of the spine, which is termed cervical radiculopathy. Common symptoms include radiating pain, numbness, tingling, weakness, and loss of motor function. These symptoms may be felt all the way to the tips of the fingers or toes, even though the nerve injury is at the base of the nerve at the spine. Radiculopathy symptoms felt in the arms and hands are usually caused by cervical radiculopathy while those in the back of the leg and the foot usually result from lumbar radiculopathy.
Read More »

What is Radiculopathy?

Posted: Monday, March 25th, 2013 | Filed under: Back health, Spinal Surgery, Spine conditions, Spine Surgery | author: By admin
Cervical Radiculopathy Disease

Radiculopathy

Radiculopathy is a term that refers to chronic injuries that result from the bones of the spinal column (vertebrae), or the cushioning discs between them, impinging on the root of a nerve in the spinal column. The symptoms of radiculopathy may be felt all the way to the tips of fingers or toes, even though the nerve compression occurs at the base of the nerve in the spine. Common symptoms include numbness, tingling, weakness, loss of motor function, and radiating pain. Read More »

Having a Pinched Nerve in Your Lower Back

Posted: Wednesday, March 20th, 2013 | Filed under: Back health, sciatica, Spinal Surgery, Spine conditions, Spine Surgery | author: By admin
Lower Back

Lower Back Pain

A pinched nerve can cause pain and restrict one’s mobility. The condition occurs when surrounding bone, muscle, cartilage or other tissue impinges on a nerve. Though pinched nerves can occur almost anywhere, the spine, and in particular pinched nerve in the lower back, or lumbar region, accounts for a significant percentage of cases. That’s because of the spine’s complex skeletal structure and the stresses placed on the lower back. This condition is referred to as a pinched lumbar nerve. Nerves of the lumbar spine extend throughout the pelvis, legs, pelvis and feet. The sciatic nerve, for example, is the longest nerve in the body, and a pinched sciatic nerve can cause a variety of pain, tingling, and other symptoms that are referred to as sciatica. Depending on the exact nerve and the extent of the pressure, a pinched nerve can cause symptoms from mild discomfort to sharp, shooting pains, tingling, weakness, loss of reflexes and motor skills, and atrophy, or withering of affected muscles. Read More »

Caring for Your Spinal Incision

Posted: Saturday, March 16th, 2013 | Filed under: Back health, Spinal Surgery, Spine conditions, Spine Surgery | author: By admin
spinal incision

spinal incision

Proper care for the surgical incision is one of the most important aspects of post-operative home recuperation following back surgery. The surgical incision may be closed with dissolvable sutures and steri-strips, staples, or sutures. Staples or visible sutures should be removed 14 days following the spinal surgery. You won’t be permitted to apply any ointments or lotions to the incision while it is healing. You should not bathe in a tub, swim, or use a hot tub until your incision is healed, either. Read More »

What is Neural Claudication?

Posted: Tuesday, March 12th, 2013 | Filed under: Back health, lumbar spinal stenosis, Spinal Stenosis, Spinal Surgery, Spine conditions, Spine Surgery | author: By admin
Neurologic claudication

Neurologic Claudication

Recently we addressed the topic of claudication, pain typically felt in the legs as a result of vascular, or blood vessel problems, or back problems such as spinal stenosis that can result in pinched nerves in the lower back. Neurogenic claudication is a common symptom of lumbar spinal stenosis, an abnormal narrowing of the spinal canal in the lumbar, or lower portion of the spine. Neurogenic refers to the problem’s genesis in the nerves, and claudication, Latin for limp, refers to the painful weakness or cramping the patient feels in his or her legs. Neurogenic claudication can be bilateral (in both legs) or unilateral (in one leg).  The pain may be triggered by walking or prolonged standing, and is typically alleviated by changing position or flexion of the waist, not simply by resting, as happens with vascular claudication.  In severe cases, the pain may be persistent. Bone spurs, bulging discs and herniated discs can also cause neurogenic claudication. Read More »

אתה ראוי לפתרון טוב יותר מקיבוע חוליות השדרה

בקש מידע נוסף