Monthly Archives: April 2013

Back Treatment Options

Posted: Monday, April 29th, 2013 | Filed under: Lumbar pain, lumbar spinal stenosis, Spinal Stenosis, Spinal Surgery, Spine conditions, Spine Surgery | author: By admin
Lumbar

Spinal fusion

In our previous blog we discussed the tremendous stresses borne by the lumbar, or lower portion of the spine comprising the five lowest vertebrae. In fact, lumbar back pain is a significant health issue, affecting about 70 to 85 percent of Americans at some point in their lives, according the National Institutes of Health (NIH). Among the most common causes of lumbar spinal problems is the degeneration of bones and tissue in the spine that occur as a normal part of aging. But one doesn’t have to be older to have lumbar spinal problems. Back pain is the most frequent cause of activity limitation in people under the age of 45, according to the NIH. Trauma or injury, poor posture and biomechanics, genetics, obesity and poor muscle tone can all result in lumbar spinal problems that cause pain, limit mobility, and have other serious health consequences. These conditions include spinal stenosis, bulging disc, herniated disc, slipped disc, radiculopathy and spondylolisthesis. Read More »

What is Lumbar Spinal Decompression?

Spinal Stenosis

Spinal Stenosis

Imagine if the branches of a tree were just as big at the top as they are at the bottom, and that sometimes, heavy loads were placed on the ends of the very highest branches. Think of the stress that would put on the lower portion of the tree trunk. Well, that’s analogous to the situation we humans experience with our spinal columns. Our spinal column is like the trunk of a tree, but we’re just as big at the top of our trunks as at the bottom. The stress this puts on our lower backs – also called the lumbar region of the spine – is exacerbated by the cumulative affect of a lifetime of lifting and twisting in combination with degenerative changes of the spine that occur as a result of aging. So it’s not surprising that the majority of back problems that bring patients to spinal specialists are centered in the lower, or lumbar region of the spine. Read More »

What is Spinal Decompression?

Posted: Tuesday, April 16th, 2013 | Filed under: Back health, Lumbar pain, lumbar spinal stenosis, Spinal Decompression, Spinal Stenosis, Spinal Surgery, Spine conditions, Spine Surgery | author: By admin
Spinal Decompression

Spinal Decompression

It may sound like something only a deep sea diver needs to be concerned about, but spinal decompression is an important topic for many people suffering from debilitating back pain. Spinal decompression refers to the process of relieving pressure on one or more pinched, or impinged nerves in the spinal column. The pressure on such nerves can cause pain, restrict mobility, and result in a host of other physical problems that can manifest in almost any part of the body. A host of spinal conditions, including spinal stenosis, disc degeneration, bulging, herniated or slipped discs, and facet syndrome can put pressure on nerves emanating from the spinal column.

Spinal decompression can be performed both surgically and non surgically. Non-surgical spinal decompression utilizes mechanical, computer controlled traction devices to reduce the pressure placed on nerves in specific portions of the spine. Inversion therapy, in which patients hang upside down, is another from of non-surgical spinal decompression. Read More »

What is Lumbar Spinal Stenosis?

Posted: Tuesday, April 9th, 2013 | Filed under: Back health, lumbar spinal stenosis, Spinal Stenosis, Spinal Surgery, Spine conditions, Spine Surgery | author: By admin
spinal stenosis

spinal stenosis exercises

Spinal stenosis – one of the most common spinal conditions – is an abnormal narrowing of the spinal canal. (“Stenosis” refers to a narrowing, or constriction.) As the spinal canal progressively narrows over time, it puts pressure on the nerves branching out from the spine, causing pain, tingling, and numbness in the extremities. The condition can occur in the lower, or lumbar region of the spine – lumbar spinal stenosis, which is the most common form – or in the neck, or cervical region of the spine – cervical spinal stenosis.

The majority of cases of spinal stenosis develop for unknown reasons, but the causes of spinal stenosis can be traced to several components of spinal anatomy, including the intervertebral discs, the facet joints that connect the vertebrae to each other, and the spinal cord. The narrowing of the spinal canal may result from abnormal bone growth and/or tissue growth, or due to a hereditary disorder. Maintaining a healthy lifestyle including exercise, good nutrition and maintaining proper weight can help prevent spinal stenosis. Read More »

Spinal Surgery for a Slipped Disc

Posted: Wednesday, April 3rd, 2013 | Filed under: Back health, Spinal Surgery, Spine conditions, Spine Surgery | author: By admin
Spinal Surgery for a Slipped Disc

Spinal Surgery Scar

A slipped disc is a common term for a herniated disc, which occurs when the central core of a spinal disc ruptures. Fluid from within the disc then leaks into the spinal canal, where it can interfere with the functioning of nerves. A slipped disc in the spine is the last stage in a degenerative disc disease process that begins with a bulging disc and progresses to a protruding disc, before it finally ruptures. The “slipped disc” has not actually shifted position. Symptoms of slipped disc vary depending on the location of the slipped disc in the spine, and the extent of the rupturing. A slipped disc may be entirely unnoticeable if it doesn’t result in pressure on a nerve. A slipped disc in the neck (a slipped cervical disc), may cause pain or numbness in the shoulders, arms or chest. A slipped disc in the lower back (a slipped lumbar disc) may cause sciatica, creating pain anywhere from the buttocks to the feet. Read More »

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