Tag Archives: spinal surgery

What is Spinal Decompression?

Posted: Tuesday, April 16th, 2013 | Filed under: Back health, Lumbar pain, lumbar spinal stenosis, Spinal Decompression, Spinal Stenosis, Spinal Surgery, Spine conditions, Spine Surgery | author: By admin
Spinal Decompression

Spinal Decompression

It may sound like something only a deep sea diver needs to be concerned about, but spinal decompression is an important topic for many people suffering from debilitating back pain. Spinal decompression refers to the process of relieving pressure on one or more pinched, or impinged nerves in the spinal column. The pressure on such nerves can cause pain, restrict mobility, and result in a host of other physical problems that can manifest in almost any part of the body. A host of spinal conditions, including spinal stenosis, disc degeneration, bulging, herniated or slipped discs, and facet syndrome can put pressure on nerves emanating from the spinal column.

Spinal decompression can be performed both surgically and non surgically. Non-surgical spinal decompression utilizes mechanical, computer controlled traction devices to reduce the pressure placed on nerves in specific portions of the spine. Inversion therapy, in which patients hang upside down, is another from of non-surgical spinal decompression. Read More »

Spinal Surgery for a Slipped Disc

Posted: Wednesday, April 3rd, 2013 | Filed under: Back health, Spinal Surgery, Spine conditions, Spine Surgery | author: By admin
Spinal Surgery for a Slipped Disc

Spinal Surgery Scar

A slipped disc is a common term for a herniated disc, which occurs when the central core of a spinal disc ruptures. Fluid from within the disc then leaks into the spinal canal, where it can interfere with the functioning of nerves. A slipped disc in the spine is the last stage in a degenerative disc disease process that begins with a bulging disc and progresses to a protruding disc, before it finally ruptures. The “slipped disc” has not actually shifted position. Symptoms of slipped disc vary depending on the location of the slipped disc in the spine, and the extent of the rupturing. A slipped disc may be entirely unnoticeable if it doesn’t result in pressure on a nerve. A slipped disc in the neck (a slipped cervical disc), may cause pain or numbness in the shoulders, arms or chest. A slipped disc in the lower back (a slipped lumbar disc) may cause sciatica, creating pain anywhere from the buttocks to the feet. Read More »

What is Neural Claudication?

Posted: Tuesday, March 12th, 2013 | Filed under: Back health, lumbar spinal stenosis, Spinal Stenosis, Spinal Surgery, Spine conditions, Spine Surgery | author: By admin
Neurologic claudication

Neurologic Claudication

Recently we addressed the topic of claudication, pain typically felt in the legs as a result of vascular, or blood vessel problems, or back problems such as spinal stenosis that can result in pinched nerves in the lower back. Neurogenic claudication is a common symptom of lumbar spinal stenosis, an abnormal narrowing of the spinal canal in the lumbar, or lower portion of the spine. Neurogenic refers to the problem’s genesis in the nerves, and claudication, Latin for limp, refers to the painful weakness or cramping the patient feels in his or her legs. Neurogenic claudication can be bilateral (in both legs) or unilateral (in one leg).  The pain may be triggered by walking or prolonged standing, and is typically alleviated by changing position or flexion of the waist, not simply by resting, as happens with vascular claudication.  In severe cases, the pain may be persistent. Bone spurs, bulging discs and herniated discs can also cause neurogenic claudication. Read More »

How do I Care for Myself at Home After My Spinal Surgery?

Posted: Friday, March 8th, 2013 | Filed under: Lumbar pain, Spinal Surgery, Spine Surgery | author: By admin
after surgery care

After Surgery Care

Patients scheduled for back surgery are rightfully concerned about their recuperation, and how they will care for themselves once home after the spinal surgery procedure. This is an important subject to discuss with your spine surgeon. Some general rules apply to all patients following back surgery. First and foremost, plan on taking an active role in your recovery, and that starts by getting into shape before your back surgery. With your surgeon, physical therapist and others, discuss what activities you can engage in as well as restrictions you need to observe. If you don’t have someone who can provide the assistance you will need in the first days after your return home following back surgery, a home attendant will be provided for you. You will be prescribed pain medications, which help you heal by letting your muscles relax, instead of contracting and writhing in reaction to pain. Let your body rest. You may require frequent naps, as your body recovers from the stress of surgery, and narcotic pain medications induce drowsiness. Read More »

Post Op Day 2

Posted: Monday, March 4th, 2013 | Filed under: Back health, Spinal Surgery, Spine conditions, Spine Surgery | author: By admin
Surgery Recovery

Surgery Recovery

You had spinal surgery two days ago – perhaps it was for a simple but persistent pinched nerve, or maybe it was a treatment for a spinal cord injury. Yesterday was your first post-operative day. You were groggy and uncomfortable, but you sensed already that something inside has been fixed, that you’re not under the same internal stress as you were before you were admitted for surgery some 48 hours ago. Possibly you spent the first night in the Intensive Care Unit, or ICU, as planned before surgery, in order to be ready for any post operative complications your spine surgeon was concerned about, due to the particulars of your spinal problem or health history. But now you’re in a regular hospital room. You had your first visit with your physical therapist yesterday and likely you got out of bed and were able to walk to a chair across the room and sit on it. Read More »

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